Plein air drawing of traditional Turkish women
TRADITIONAL TURKISH WOMEN
Women of the Akkus Family Çanakyayla Nazime Sibel Imran Ceylan Çanakyayla -©2016 TriciVenola — These are traditional girls, and one is married into the family. They never show their faces except to their husbands and to other women, but they were happy to be drawn. We had a fine time with much cracking up. The white lacy kerchiefs are for married women. Ceylan’s is streaked with vivid colour as she was yet unmarried. Whenever RIdvan or Mehmet came into the room, back went the face veils. All around our feet was a horde of obstreperous little boys. I posted a commemorative photo, but got an immediate call from Celal in Istanbul requesting I take it down. Two of the girls’ husbands worked for him at the restaurant there. “Kids are fine,” he said, “and drawings are great, but nobody wants a picture of his wife or sister all over the Internet.” But they loved the drawings.
Women of the Akkus Family Çanakyayla Nazime Sibel Imran Ceylan Çanakyayla -©2016 TriciVenola — These are traditional girls, and one is married i...
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Typical Topkapi Tourist

His wife and daughter were undoubtedly inside, lost in raptures at being completely surrounded by ormolu. After a couple of days drawing all this French Ottoman froufrou, I was just finishing up when this guy stomped out of the palace and flopped down on the bench. I couldn’t resist!

The tree and the palace decor are likely the same vintage: 18thC. The Ottomans built this palace after 1453. One Sultan’s mother was French, and it shows.

His wife and daughter were undoubtedly inside, lost in raptures at being completely surrounded by ormolu. After a couple of days drawing all this Fren...
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Typical Topkapi Tourist Framed Print
His wife and daughter were undoubtedly inside, lost in raptures at being completely surrounded by ormolu. After a couple of days drawing all this French Ottoman froufrou, I was just finishing up when this guy stomped out of the palace and flopped down on the bench. I couldn’t resist! The tree and the palace decor are likely the same vintage: 18thC. The Ottomans built this palace after 1453. One Sultan's mother was French, and it shows.
His wife and daughter were undoubtedly inside, lost in raptures at being completely surrounded by ormolu. After a couple of days drawing all this ...
Add to cart