Earth Angel Flyer T-shirt
EARTH ANGEL 1990-91 The worst fear I have is overpopulation. I thought of the Earth trying valiantly to save itself from too much of us, flinging disease after disaster. I thought of those awesome depictions of the Black Death as a flying skeleton, clearing away the clutter of too much birth. Since making art of my fears helps me sleep at night, I painted it. The clutter is all the junk people in America were buying for their kids, and the earth without it. A French friend looked at it and said, “Haha! That’s why the word is litter… for birth and for trash.” Painting this took about two months, and incorporated images from eleven previous paintings in the series, which I called Brazen Images. We meant it for a calendar, but couldn’t get anyone to print it back in those early Mac days. The previous eleven paintings were mouse-created in Studio 8, using only 256 colors, and are thankfully preserved in this condition. Blown up, they look like mosaics. In 1991, they were all reworked when Adobe Photoshop came out with its millions of colors. Earth Angel was started in Studio 8, but finished in Photoshop. After I’d painted that skull on the Wacom there was no going back, and I was able to create the rest of the skeleton to match. The earliest work files show a clumsy skeleton but a terrific arch, as I’d finally gotten to visit Rome and its wonderful tombs full of juxtaposition. In the finished work, dimly around the inside of the arch appear various dieties from the Brazen Images paintings. The images represent fertility and birth and are applauding the clearing away of the junk. In other words: Enough. Also appearing are elements painted in 1988 in MacDraw II, which only allowed 8 colors, count them 8: black, white, magenta, red, yellow, green, blue, turquoise. I made Pointellist patterns in these colors and painted ads with them for BBDO.
EARTH ANGEL 1990-91 The worst fear I have is overpopulation. I thought of the Earth trying valiantly to save itself from too much of us, flinging ...
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Screaming Betty Page T-Shirt
SCREAMING BETTIE PAGE 1992 She was the Counterculture poster girl of the 1950s. Bettie Page appeared in a fetching Santa hat and nothing else in the first issue of Playboy, and after that she became a legend in girly magazine circles. Not only did she have a fabulous body and an adorable face, but she and photographer Bunny Yaeger worked as a team, with a keen sense of humor, coming up with those over-the-top Bondage and Wild Woman poses. An entire generation of men grew up drooling over Bettie Page; her trademark black pageboy hairdo, with saucy bangs, has appeared as homage in everything from Archie Comics to Pulp Fiction. At some point Bettie married, became Born Again, moved to Florida and disappeared. Later it emerged that she’d had mental problems, largely caused by financial stress. Ironically her photos passed into the public domain. In the 1980s her star rose again with a generation of new fans. Bettie became aware that, in her seventies, she had become a pop icon. She moved back to LA and into the Playboy Mansion, and with the help of old friend Hugh Hefner, hired an attorney who put her in the black, gave press interviews (no pictures), inspired a movie based on her life, and autographed a print of this very painting. If you know who stole it, please return it. After all, Bettie liked the painting and autographed it for me. I painted Bettie from photos but put on fishnets and posed the legs myself. I already had the skull, and it was simple to set it on fire. I painted this in 1992, in 72 dpi, to thank dear Fred- I’ve lost his last name- for giving me my first Wacom tablet. In 1995 I sold Giclee prints of Screaming Bettie Page at a show next to a tattoo parlor on Sunset Boulevard. In 2004, this exact image appeared in a tattoo magazine, on somebody’s chest. In 2016 I bit the bullet and repainted it in 300 dpi poster-size. It took two weeks, but it’s a hell of a poster and yes, we’ll make it available.
SCREAMING BETTIE PAGE 1992 She was the Counterculture poster girl of the 1950s. Bettie Page appeared in a fetching Santa hat and nothing else in t...
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Skull on Fire T-Shirt
SKULL ON FIRE 1991 The first thing I ever drew with a Wacom. After a demo at LAMUG came a knock on the door, outside was Fred, the Wacom rep with the first, huge, tablet in his arms like a baby, presenting it to me. I borrowed the skull from a friend who had bought the skeleton entire from someone who got it in 1968. We think she was Indian, as they used to sell their impoverished dead. My dentist said that the tooth exposed in her lower jaw may well have killed her. I propped her mouth open with a flashlight and spent the night drawing her. Afterwards I’d be in cut off in traffic, thinking, whatta jerk— and then— but he has one of THOSE in his head. A miracle. To thank Fred, I set the skull on fire and sat Bettie Page on it in her underwear. The skull was the one used in many artworks. In 2016, I repainted Screaming Bettie Page poster-size in 300 dpi.
SKULL ON FIRE 1991 The first thing I ever drew with a Wacom. After a demo at LAMUG came a knock on the door, outside was Fred, the Wacom rep with ...
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