GHOST CHURCH 4: THE FLOATING ROBE OF POWER

 

Copper Cross tiny - GHOST CHURCH 4: THE FLOATING ROBE OF POWER

Near Juvenile Court72 - GHOST CHURCH 4: THE FLOATING ROBE OF POWER
Near Juvenile Court ©2004 TriciVenola

Fifteen years in this neighborhood, Iftar in carpet shops, coffee and gossip, friends, errands, parties, informal tours, drawing, and all the while this great slumbering ghost sprawled across the hill. These shabby old bits I call clues were part of an edifice so important by the 8th century that it held an alleged Girdle of the Virgin. This is hotly contested by at least one Byzantine scholar, but I like to think about St Mary’s robe floating in the ether of a Byzantine collective memory, down under the tourist eateries, travel agencies, and Ottoman plaster.

The Cambrai Madonna from the Met.
The Cambrai Madonna, New York Met.

The mid-5th century was early days for the great Christian empire. Constantine the Great, who declared Christianity the official religion, had only been gone a hundred years. The city had been Constantinople for only a century, full of Pagan echoes, in the sacred fantastical animals, in the worship of the saints. The great Theodosian Walls, those hulking savaged monuments still standing, were new, built by Anthemius, Regent of the Eastern Roman Empire, named after the crowned child, Theodosius II.

Dragon Lamp ©2002 Trici Venola
Dragon Lamp ©2002 Trici Venola

The weak young Emperor Arcadius was dead, and his hated sensuous Empress Eudoxia was dead as well. Their son Theodosius II was crowned at age seven, but it was his sister who ruled: Aelia Pulcheria, granddaughter to Theodosius the Great:

Theodosius I - GHOST CHURCH 4: THE FLOATING ROBE OF POWER

He was the Emperor who set up the Egyptian Obelisk in the Hippodrome in 390, and who built the second Hagia Sophia, the one that was burned in the Nika Rebellion of 532. And on his gradkids, just look at those cold pale eyes.

Pulcheria and Theodosius II
Pulcheria, at left, and her brother, Theodosius II

Pulcheria was nine when she began to train her little brother to be Emperor. In stark contrast to her scandalous mother, who wore bangs like a courtesan and flaunted her adulteries, Pulcheria took a Vow of Chastity, consecrating her virginity to God. Her piety was undeniable, but she was also menaced by Anthemius the Wall-Builder who was determined to marry into the royal family. The Vow protected her. She blocked all his avenues and made her sisters swear virginity, too. Grim times indeed: three serious princesses stitching altar cloths in a palace forbidden to men, and levity of any kind.  Anthemius might have been a better ruler, but at 15, Pulcheria sacked him and proclaimed herself Regent, declaring herself Augusta, Empress of the Eastern Roman Empire.

Spirit of Constantinople72 - GHOST CHURCH 4: THE FLOATING ROBE OF POWER

NEXT: GHOST CHURCH 5: THE CULT OF THE VIRGIN

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