the gordion knot - ALEXANDER RIDES TO MIDAS

ALEXANDER RIDES TO MIDAS

THE GORDION KNOT OF HISTORY

In honor of the ISIL- desecrated Guardians of Nimrud, we post this classic piece on the importance, not to mention the fun, of museums. Thanks to them, the Guardians are still with us. Read on, and keep reading through all the links, to go with them through the Gates and down the garden path, in unexpected company.

Alexander Rides to Midas.all  - ALEXANDER RIDES TO MIDAS
Alexander Rides to Midas (Archeological Museum, Istanbul) ©2012 Trici Venola

Alexander the Great died in 323 BC. He was 33.  Alexander died of a bone infection from an old arrow wound.  It’s possible that his immune system was compromised by his grief, bordering on dementia, over the death of Hephaestion, his closest friend, greatest general, second in command and, some say, the love of his life.

Hephaestion Straight Up
Hephaestion

Like the god he believed himself to be, the Golden Conqueror would never age. He won the respect and admiration of his own time and successive generations. In awe and affection they continue to laud him, creating imagery in all media from marble to film.

His actual body was mummified in Alexandria, Egypt, by Egyptian necromancers, and was still in a good state of preservation three centuries after his death, when Caesar Augustus leaned into its glass sarcophagus to kiss the Conqueror and, slipping, broke off the mummy’s nose. But Alexander’s tomb and body disappeared. The Alexander Sarcophagus in Istanbul’s Archeological Museum is the nearest thing we have.

Alexander Sarcophagus Detail

Alexander is still fighting and hunting lions on this museum centerpiece  from the great Necropolis at Sidon.  The stunning bas-relief was created by unknown talent during Alexander’s lifetime. It’s possible that the artist actually set eyes on him.

Alexander SarcophagusThe art commemorates victory over the Persians at the Battle of Issus in what is now Turkey, and Hephaestion is there fighting as well. Scholars argue over who was buried in the tomb, but he may have commissioned the work before his death with an eye toward Alexandrian help in future battles. The Alexander Sarcophagus was discovered, in what is now Lebanon, in 1887 and brought to Istanbul by Osman Hamdi Bey, the great Ottoman statesman, archeologist and artist who built Istanbul’s Archeological Museum.

Alex In Better Shape

Alexander Is In Better Shape (Archeological Museum. Istanbul) ©1999 Trici Venola.

Alexander in MuseumAnd here is the rock star himself, Alexander. This still has traces of yellow paint in the marble hair, rose on the lips. It’s one of several done in the second century BC, when the artist might have had Alexander’s mummy to work from. I find this plausible because the forehead wrinkles are realistic for Alexander but idealized out of many statues.

THE GORDION KNOT

 In the drawing up top, Alexander rubs shoulders with an ancient Cypriot statue of Bes, the God of Plenty, a Hittite lion 5500 years old, and King Midas. A skeletal cohort of Midas– nobody knows who it is- rests upstairs among swanky grave goods built of boxwood from 740 BC.

midas gold - ALEXANDER RIDES TO MIDAS
Midas Gold (Antalya Archeological Museum) ©2000 TriciVenola

Midas was  King of the Phrygians, whose capitol of Gordion is near Turkey’s capitol, Ankara. The Phrygians invented a smelting technique that made bronze shine like gold, so yes, everything Midas touched turned to gold. And we thought it was just a fairy tale. Here’s some Midas Gold in the Archeological Museum in Antalya. It actually looks like titanium. There’s also a Madonna whose breasts weep blood, three jolly bronze creatures and a festive phallic bronze pin. I love drawing in museums. The stuff in those cases is laughing at you.

Midas Gold hatpin e1544626593755 - ALEXANDER RIDES TO MIDAS
Midas Gold.detail ©2000TriciVenola

Gordion is the Home of the Gordion Knot. More fairy tales: Nobody could untie the Gordion Knot. Alexander famously solved this dilemma. He pulled out his sword and cut it.

Alexander Cuts the Gordion Knot
Alexander Cuts the Gordion Knot by Jean-Simon Barthelemy (1743-1811)

Turkey is a veritable Gordion Knot of history. The threads keep weaving in and out, disappearing and reappearing, that I will never ever live long enough to unravel.

antalya museum intro - ALEXANDER RIDES TO MIDAS
Antalya Museum Intro ©2000 TriciVenola

In a beloved tale, King Midas judged Pan the winner in a music contest with Apollo, and a furiously un-godlike Apollo gave him donkey’s ears. The little figures below are Midas Gold and smaller than a hand. I haven’t yet been to the museum in Ankara since its renovation, but hope we can still see Midas’s magnificent wooden furniture preserved and reassembled over years by dedicated archeologists.

The Gordion Knot

A rendition of the Gordion Knot.

Next: LIONS CAN LIVE THOUSANDS OF YEARS

5 comments

  1. eastwestunity55

    Hooray, Trici. You did it again. Love and blessings to you from Mount Shasta, Lewis

  2. Alan

    . . just wonderful – again! How your words and drawings compliment each other.

  3. Elaine

    Trici, you are a wonder, keeping alive beautiful and historic Turkey. I think u know how much I love your drawings and commentary xx

  4. Destiny Moretz

    Greetings from Colorado! I’m bored at work so I decided to check out your site on my iphone during lunch break. I really like the information you provide here and can’t wait to take a look when I get home. I’m amazed at how fast your blog loaded on my mobile .. I’m not even using WIFI, just 3G .. Anyhow, excellent site!

    1. Trici Venola

      Thank you, Destiny. You may wind up leaving this job with a handle on Byzantine history. Glad you like that post, it’s one of my favorites. –TriciVenola

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